Actions The Body Clothing Direction Expletives

French Holiday & Travel

Information for visitors to France

 

Your French Holiday, Hosted by Vickerstaff.net


 


French Tutorial

Learn French

While you are in France you will probably make yourself understood by speaking "Text Book" French and make much use of the dictionary you armed yourself with before starting your holiday. However if you really want to impress with your language skills you could speak a little of the modern, progressive French language in every day use today. Just like every language, French is rich in colloquialisms and slang or 'argot'. Here are some examples of everyday French language and simple colloquial terms to get you started:

 

 

FRENCH

Romance Language of 128 Million
3 volume PDF E-Book with over 100 sections taking you from basic French phrases, through grammar and language structure to colloquial expressions, abbreviations and slang.

An invaluable resource for anyone planning to visit France.

English

-

French

A phone call - Un coup de fil
To ask - Demander, questionner
To burn - Brûler, Crûmer
To feel - Ressentir
To kiss - S'embrasser, un baiser, se rouler des pelles
To laugh - Rigoler, Se marrer
To look - Regarder, Visionner, , Mater, reluquer
To put - Poser, Mettre
To see - Voir
To sing - Chanter (sing well) , brailler, beugler (sing badly)
To tell - Dire
To touch - Toucher , Peloter (a girl for example)
To walk - Se promener, marcher , Se balader
Backside - Les fesses, Le cul (ass)
Beard - La barbouze , (can mean secret policeman)
Belly - Le ventre , Le bide, Le bidon, la bedaine
Body - La carcasse
Ears - Les oreilles , Les esgourdes
Eyes - Les yeux , Les mirettes
Face - La tronche, la bouille
Foot - Le panard
Hair - Les tifs
Hands - Les mains , Les paluches
Head - Le caillou, la citrouille, le ciboulot
Headache - Un mal de tête
Heart - Le palpitant
Leg - La patte, la guibole
Legs - "Les-" jambes , quilles , guibolles
Lips - Les babines
Moustache - Les bacchants
Mouth - Bouche, le bec (beak), la gueule (animal's mouth)
Nose - Le nez , Le tarin
Thighs (particularly female) - "Les -" cuisses, jambons (hams), gigots (legs of lamb)
The shoes - Les chaussures , Les pompes
The underpants - Les caleçons , Les calebards
A pain in the ass - Mal au cul
Damn - Zut
Shut up - Tais-toi , Ta gueule, boucle la
Big - Gros (M) , Balaise (M)
Great - Formidable, génial , Super, sensas
Little - Petit (M) , Minus (M), nain (M)
Entrance - Entrée
Exit - Sortie
Forbidden - Defense d'entrée
One-way - Sens unique
A fish - Un poisson , La poascaille
A lemon - Un citron
Cherries - Les cerises (F)
Drink - Boire Picoler, se bourrer
Eat - Manger , Bouffer, se goinfrer, s'empiffrer
Food - La nourriture , La bouffe, la mangeaille, la graille
Fork - Une fourchette
Glass - Un verre
Meat - La viande (F)
Knife - Couteau
Plate - Une assiette
Sausages - La charcuterie (F) , La charcutaille (F)
Spoon - Cuillère
Water - L'eau , La flotte
A chair - Une chaise (F)
A cigarette - Une cigarette (F) , Une clope (F)
A paper - Un papier (M) , Un papelard (M)
A thing - Un machin, un truc
A Book - Un bouquin
A Cigarette - Une sèche
A Lighter - Un briquet , Un feu
The music - La musique (F) , La zique (F)
The television - La télé, la télévision , La lucarne
Hi - Bonjour , Salut
A best friend - Un meilleur ami (F) (M)
A friend - Un ami (F) (M) , Un pote (M)
A guy - Un mec (M)
A nice woman - Une bonne femme
Brother - Un frangin
Crazy about... - Fou de..
Darling - Une chérie, ma chérie
Feelings - Sentiments, émotions (F)
Friend, pal - Un copain, une copaine
Heartache - Un arrêt cardiaque
Kid - Un/une gosse, un gamin,une gamine
Lover - Un amoureux, un amant
Mad keen for... - Dingue de ...
Man - Un type, un mec
Man, guy - Un homme , Un mec, un type, un gars

Menu

 

FRENCH

Romance Language of 128 Million
3 volume PDF E-Book with over 100 sections taking you from basic French phrases, through grammar and language structure to colloquial expressions, abbreviations and slang.

An invaluable resource for anyone planning to visit France.

 

In modern French words are sometimes shortened, the abridged words often end with 'o', for example:

Dictionary - dictionnaire becomes dico
      Slide, transparency - diapositive becomes diapo
Fridge - réfrigerateur becomes frigo
Weather forecast - les previsions météorologiques becomes météo
Ecologist - écologiste becomes écolo
Intellectual - intellectuel becomes intello
Megalomaniac - mégalomane becomes mégalo
Fascist - fasciste becomes facho
Director, boss - Directeur becomes dirlo

 

Other words are simply truncated, for example:

Ok, agree, alright - D'accord becomes d'ac
     baccalauréat (exam) - baccalauréat becomes bac
faculty (university) - faculté becomes fac
profit - bénéfice becomes bénef
demonstration - manifestation becomes manif                           
capable - capable becomes cap
aluminium - aluminium becomes alu
transvestite - travelot becomes trav

Menu

When talking to young children, many French adults simply repeat one syllable from a word, twice. A number of words have developed by this mechanism, for example: These words often appear in adult jokes, so it is worth learning basic kids' vocabulary even if you don't expect to spend much time talking to children.

 

                grandmother - grand-mère becomes mémé
grandfather - grand-père becomes pépé (Do not confuse with pipi)
uncle - oncle becomes tonton
aunt - tante becomes tata
milk - lait becomes lolo
teddy bear - ours becomes nounours.

 

The French have several words for children (les enfants), not all of them are complimentary. The most common 'argot' word for kids is 'les gosses'. However, the word 'gosse' is often prefixed with the adjective 'sale', meaning dirty. The phrase 'un sale gosse' translates better as 'a little brat' rather than the literal 'a dirty kid'. Similarly, 'un gosse de riches' means 'a spoilt rich brat'. Other words for kids include 'les gamins', 'les lardons', 'les marmots' and finally 'les morveux' which means snotty nosed

Some French Words
You Already Know

 

  While you are in France you will see and hear lots of words you recognise. With over 4000 words of French having the same spelling and meaning as English and thousands more words with the same meaning and similar spellings, you already speak some French without even knowing it.
  The pronunciation is different but once you have listened to the language being spoken for a day or two you will begin to get an 'ear' for how words sound and begin to recognise more words that you already know.

 

Absent
Accident
Action
Adorable
Attention
Avenue
Bizarre
Blond
Bouquet
Boutique
Brunette
Bureau
Café
Chauffeur
Chef
Client
Communication
Cousin
Critique
Danger
Depot
Diesel
Encore
Ensemble
Entrepreneur
Excellent
Fruit
Garage
Humble
Image
Important
Index
Information
Intelligent
Lingerie
Liqueur
Matinee
Menu
Musical
Nation
Nature
Original
Omelette
Page
Parking
Patient
Picnic
Place
Police
Public
Question
Recyclable
Rendezvous
Restaurant
Rouge
Route
Routine
Sabotage
Silhouette
Souvenir
Stable
Station
Table
Table d'hote
Train
Vain
Vinaigrette
Visible
Voyage